The NTP has issued its final technical report on the toxicology (including genotoxicity) and carcinogenicity of zinc, following a 2-year study in Sprague Dawley rats receiving diets either deficient in, or containing excess, zinc (as zinc carbonate basic). There was “equivocal evidence of carcinogenic activity” in male rats receiving zinc-deficient diets (3.5 or 7 ppm) based on higher incidences of adenoma of the pancreas (and more animals with multiple pancreatic adenomas). There was “no evidence of carcinogenic activity” in female rats exposed to zinc-deficient diets, and “no evidence of carcinogenic activity” in male and female rats given diets containing excess zinc (250 or 500 ppm). Increased incidences of non-neoplastic lesions of the pancreas were observed in male and female rats receiving excess zinc, whilst male rats with zinc-deficient diets had increased incidences of non-neoplastic lesions of the testes.

US National Toxicology Program (2019). NTP Technical Report on the toxicology and carcinogenesis study of dietary zinc (CAS No. 5263-02-5) in Sprague Dawley Rats (Hsd: Sprague Dawley SD) (Feed study). NTP TR 592. Final. January 2019.

https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/htdocs/lt_rpts/tr592.pdf

 

The above items were taken from the April 2019 issue of Toxicology and Regulatory News which is sent automatically to members of bibra.

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